Three of a kind...

Masonic Street 18x24sm

 

These three houses in a row all have the same design, with a matching front porch, a bay window on the second floor, and a widow’s watch on top. I They look great in the morning light, when it’s easiest to see the slight variations in whites. There’s a lot of nice color reflected into the shadows on those white buildings. I also love the character of the old tree in the front yard. This painting is 18×24″.

Morning on Talbot...

Morning on Talbot 18x24sm

 

This spring I’ve had fun getting back outside to paint on location, and I’ve especially enjoyed painting some of the streets of Rockland. I found out some fun history about this street while I painted here. These two houses were apparently designed by the same architect, who built the house in the foreground for himself to live in. My friend and a great painter, Kevin Beers, told me that the house in back was painted by Edward Hopper. I also got to meet some of the people living in these houses, and it was fun to see their interest in my painting. This one is 18×24″.

View from the dock...

From the dock 12x16sm

 

This is a late day painting of a quiet harbor. I like the light of the scene, but I also like the pops of color. The blue crate in the foreground, and the orange life ring make for fun moments. I’m also taking advantage of the overall contrast between warm and cool colors to create a feeling of late-day-glow. The longer I paint the more I realize how much information about a scene can be conveyed just through the use of color. One of my favorite Hawthorne quotes is a good reminder of this lesson.┬áDo not put in the features, the right spots of color will tell you more about the appearance, the likeness of a person, than features or good drawing. Make it so that I could recognize the subject from color alone, for color is also a likeness.”

Holy Mackerel!!!...

Mackerel 12x24

 

This is one of the few still life paintings I’ve done this year on the smaller side. It’s 12×24″ an oil on canvas. I like the reflective qualities and the pattern of the fish, but as usual, I’m just as interested in the tablecloth pattern as I am in the central subject of the fish. Maybe it’s because they want to be in the water, but I seem to prefer the fish against a blue pattern. I hope to do a few more of these paintings of other types of fish, but it’s surprisingly hard to get my hands on whole fish. As the weather warms up I’m assuming that’ll get easier and I look forward to some new subjects.

Day’s End...

Days End 12x16sm

 

The warm light at the end of the day is stunning, but so fleeting it can be hard to catch. This painting was done in the studio from a photo, but using color lessons I’ve learned working on location. Even though I’m using the photo for a lot of the basic color information, I’m also punching the color temperature up a bit, and painting in subtle differences that are hard to capture with a camera. This richness of color is how I try to capture a sense of light in the landscape. Even when working in the studio, I want my paintings to be about a sense of light. This is a view looking down into New Harbor just before sunset.

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